Tuesday, 20 April 2021

Harnessing the power of public activism for European Climate Action

Public activism within countries been a strength of European climate action so far. But non-state actors are each driven by their own priorities—and the challenge will be how to harness their energies while focusing these coherently in support of national and global climate strategies.

This blog reports on the closing session of a virtual conference, European Climate Action: Political Economy Challenges, hosted by the European Studies Centre of St. Antony’s College Oxford, on January 21, 2021, which considered how to engage non-state actors most effectively in climate action.

The panel included Philip Lymbery, Global CEO of Compassion in World Farming; Nick Mabey, CEO, E3G and Alex Clark, Smith School of Enterprise and the Environment, Oxford; it was chaired by Sir David Madden, St. Antony’s College. The conference was then closed by Charles Enoch, ESC Fellow and Head of EuPEP. Click here for the podcast of session 4 and closing remarks.

Investment in climate action—Governments and the private sector must work together

It has been clear for some time that the cost of investment needed in climate action is too great for the official sector alone to bear—and indeed it should not try to, given the profit opportunities for the private sector to invest in new areas. However, the financing landscape is complex, and rapidly evolving; likewise, the rules and boundaries of climate financing are just emerging and continue to shift.

This blog reports on the third session of a virtual conference, European Climate Action: Political Economy Challenges, hosted by the European Studies Centre of St. Antony’s College Oxford, on January 21, 2021, which considered the needs of the various financing players and their appropriate roles.

The panel included Josué Tanaka, Visiting Professor, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change; Olaf Sleijpen, Executive Director of Dutch National Bank responsible for Climate Change; Isabelle Mateos y Lago, Managing Director, Blackrock; it was chaired by Professor Kalypso Nicolaidis, St. Antony’s College. Click here for the podcast of session 3.

Paying for the European Green Deal—Fiscal and social challenges

Climate action is expensive, and European budgets will be even more constrained in the coming decade by the fallout from covid-19. A key question for governments will be how to pay for climate-related reforms.

This blog reports on the second session of a virtual conference, European Climate Action: Political Economy Challenges, hosted by the European Studies Centre of St Antony’s College Oxford, on January 21, 2021, which tackled this difficult question.

The panel included Jean Pisani-Ferry, Senior Fellow at Bruegel and PIIE, Professor EUI; Dora Iakova, IMF, Assistant Director leading IMF work on European Climate Policies; and Linus Mattauch, Martin School, Oxford; it was chaired by Professor Tim Vlandas, St Antony’s College. Click here for the podcast of session 2.

Europe and COP26—Contribution and expectations

By its early commitment to the European Green Deal, the EU has taken on a lead role in the coming round of climate negotiations, COP26 in Glasgow in November 2021. Next questions are: what it will take, beyond the Green Deal, to make the COP a true success, and then, what it will take for Europe to implement the Green Deal successfully.

This blog reports on the first session of a virtual conference, European Climate Action: Political Economy Challenges, hosted by the European Studies Centre of St. Antony’s College Oxford, on January 21, 2021, which considered these questions.

The panel included Mauro Petriccione, Director General for Climate, European Commission; Emmanuel Guérin, Executive Director, European Climate Foundation; and Heidi Hautala, Vice-President, European Parliament; it was chaired by Professor Thomas Hale, Blavatnik School of Government. Click here for the podcast of this session (which begins at 10.38 after opening remarks).